(This webpage is dedicated to MICROMANAGEMENT)
These are the words of Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D :
Now, for a more personal situation:
Option A:
Option B:
Option A end results:
Option B end results:
COMING SOON:
(Let the professional do his job)
(Micromanage the professional)
(You are recovered and well)
(You are dead)
It is discovered, that you have come down with a life threatening illness, in which taking no action, would result in imminent death. Having been made aware of that, your only recourse is to seek the proper professional help, that has the chance of saving you.
After the initial shock of the diagnosis sets in, you realize that there are only 2 options to your avail.


Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
Before Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
After Micromanagement:
Dilbert on micromanagement:
OBTAINING RESULTS:
FREEDOM TO INNOVATE:
SPEED & EFFICIENCY:
WORK ENVIRONMENT:
PRODUCT QUALITY:
BENEFITS / BONUSES:
EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION:
(To better understand this stuff, let me draw you a picture.)
(I assume you now, "GET THE PICTURE", of the negative impact micromanagement has on a company.)
ETHICS TRAINING
WILL BE REQUIRED
FOR ALL EMPLOYEES!


"Have you ever worked for a micromanager? I have, and it's frustrating. In fact, it usually makes the job harder and less rewarding."

"Simply put, micromanaging is a bad leadership strategy, and there are several reasons why:"

1. Hovering. Micromanagers constantly monitor the workers they supervise. Being constantly observed and evaluated can cause worker stress. It can slow down the work process, as the employee constantly fears that she or he will make a mistake and incur the dissatisfaction (or wrath) of the manager. From the leader's perspective, micromanaging is a strategy of vigilance-policing workers to look for, and correct, behavior that deviates from the "accepted procedures." This means the leader spends all of his or her time observing and correcting and has no time for other important leadership/management duties.

2. Autonomy. A primary motivator for many workers is autonomy-being allowed to choose how and when to perform tasks, and having some decision-making authority about your job. Micromanaging quashes this and de-motivates workers.

3. Stifling Creativity. Without allowing workers to develop their own ideas and work-related strategies because of the need to control everything, the micromanager is destined to stifle worker creativity and innovation. This hurts the organization's ability to innovate and evolve.

4. Stifling Employee Growth. The only way for workers to learn and develop in their jobs and increase their skill sets is to try new things, and learn on their own. Micromanaging keeps workers from becoming more skilled and valuable to the organization.

5. Turnover. Most workers are turned off by micromanagers. The independent, creative, self-motivated employees are the first to go, and losing those star performers can be devastating to the organization's success.













Click here to visit Ronald's website: